Airport / 27 September 2016

Pioneering tote-based baggage handling system for the US

San Francisco International Airport (SFO) has become the first airport in the US to choose a tote-based individual carrier system for baggage handling.  We are delighted to have been chosen to partner with the Airport and its design-build teams on this pioneering project which is part of the Terminal 1 (T1) Redevelopment Program.

Currently T1 has multiple baggage systems, each of which is independently operated by a separate carrier.  This is a legacy model from when airlines owned, maintained and operated their own baggage handling systems.  But nowadays, many global airports are migrating to a common-use model, where airlines share the cost benefits of using a single baggage system.  This has additional benefits too, such as greater operational efficiency, greater flexibility for the airlines and a consolidated security checkpoint for compliance with North American Transportation Security Administration (TSA) regulations.

This exciting new project allows us to participate in the programming phase of the baggage handling project, the first time that any provider has been invited to do so in the US.  The planned design process promises to deliver the best solution for the Airport and all its stakeholders – we can’t wait to see the system up and running!

About the Author

Klaus Schäfer
Klaus Schäfer

Klaus Schäfer is Managing Director of Crisplant. He has held positions within the automation industry for almost three decades, including sales, engineering, project management and development of baggage, cargo and other material handling systems. In this blog, Schäfer looks at some of the current topics of the airport world and how the baggage handling business can contribute to developing the airport industry.

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